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V12 Laraki, CCC Tours

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Publication Eric van Hove - V12 Laraki

With interviews with the craftsmen, documentation of the process and essays by Eric van Hove, Simon Njami, Maylis de Kerangal, Hamid Irbouh, Laurent Courtens, Amanda Sarroff-Robion and Ayoub El Mouzaïne. The publication is edited by the artist, Amanda Sarroff-Robion and Hicham Khalidi, designed by Nina Støttrup Larsen and Femke Herregraven and photographed by Keetja Allard.

18 September - 16 November 2014
Atchilihtallah: Eric van Hove

The exhibition Atchilihtallah showcases alongside other recent works, V12 Laraki, a piece that features a Mercedes-Benz 6.2 L V12 engine crafted in collaboration with fifty-five Moroccan master craftsmen. Atchilihtallah is a Moroccan saying that translates literally as This is what God gave us!. The saying expresses a sense of finality, of having reached an end. In using this title, the exhibition aims to unearth the contradictions that underlie this aphorism in order to explore the position of the crafter as a metaphor of a broader system. Atchilihtallah and V12 Laraki aims to investigate these and other apparently opposed attitudes and create a space in which to perceive and consider, in a postcolonial and post-Fordist context, juxtapositions between craft and industry, entanglements between the Occident and the Orient, etc.

STUK Kunstencentrum, Leuven, Belgium

Exhibition: 18 September - 16 November 2014

Book presentation and conference: 23 October 2014
With Eric van Hove, Jean-Hubert Martin and Pascal Gielen

Nine Moroccan craftsmen will be present from 21–30 October.

The exhibition is curated by Hicham Khalidi

Longer text:

Atchilihtallah is the title of Éric van Hove’s upcoming solo exhibition. Alongside other recent works, the exhibition showcases V12 Laraki, a piece that features a Mercedes- Benz 6.2L V12 engine crafted in collaboration with fifty-five Moroccan master craftsmen. Based in Marrakech since 2013, the artist has often referred to his atelier in the Maghreb as a “socio-economic sculpture”; consequently, he has decided to transpose it to STUK’s gallery space, inviting nine craftsmen to work in this transplanted studio for ten days.

Atchilihtallah is a Moroccan saying that translates literally as This is what God gave us!. The saying expresses a sense of finality, of having reached an end. The invocation of God brings all discussion to a close and indicates that there is nothing more that we can do: human action cedes to divine volition. But Atchilihtallah also suggests that what we have been given in life, no matter how minimal it might seem, is in fact an opportunity —one that we can and should build from in a spirit of humility. In popular culture, the saying is often used as an exhortation to consider the positive aspects of situations that could otherwise be considered final or deadlocked.

In using this title, the exhibition aims to unearth the contradictions that underlie this aphorism in order to explore the position of the crafter as a metaphor of a broader system. The saying, with its initial evocation of futility and finality, seems to contradict the endeavour of painstakingly remaking a non-working Mercedes V12 engine by hand, but underneath that contradiction is an allusion to the sacred gift this engine represents: despite its apparent uselessness, it is what God gave us.

Atchilihtallah and V12 Laraki investigate these and other apparently opposed attitudes and create a space in which to perceive and consider, in a postcolonial and post-Fordist context, juxtapositions between craft and industry, entanglements between the Occident and the Orient, etc.

The exhibition is supported by:

STUK Art Centre VZW

Private collectors

Le Service des Arts plastiques de la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium

La Communauté française de Belgique, Brussels, Belgium

The Flemish Government (50 years of Migration)

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